Entries tagged with Data Collection

amrikcooper's picture
amrikcooper
• 10/17/17
• 0 Comments

Editor's note: This post, authored by Amrik Cooper of SurveyCTO, originally appeared on the SurveyCTO blog.

We are pleased to announce our first pre-built SurveyCTO form, in collaboration with Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA).

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Sharada Ramanathan's picture
Sharada Ramanathan
• 10/05/15
• Posted in Data Collection
• 2 Comments

In this age of ‘lean data’, organizations are seeking ways to reduce the data collection burden and cost in order to get meaningful, actionable data about their clients. Practitioners value the PPI for its statistical rigor, relatively low implementation cost, simplicity and transparency… the PPI is ‘lean data’. The national surveys upon which the PPI is based are conducted by enumerators in respondents’ homes, so the PPI is most accurate when it replicates that and the survey is done in-person and at-home. However, it can become expensive and time-consuming to administer the PPI if regular visits to a client’s home are not already built into an organization’s business model.

Given the trend to explore leaner ways to collect impact data, including PPI data, we wanted to test alternative interview methods that could potentially be less expensive, faster, and make it easier for organizations to administer the PPI. With funding from the Ford Foundation, Grameen Foundation worked with Mark Schreiner, developer of the PPI, to test the accuracy of alternative methods...

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Elaine Chang's picture
Elaine Chang
• 04/22/15
• Posted in Data Collection
• 0 Comments

Cross-posted from TaroWorks' Blog

TaroWorks now enables you to see Progress out of Poverty Index (PPI) results with built-in reports and dashboards. In addition to accessing all PPI scorecard questions through TaroWorks’ survey library, organizations can now see aggregated results as surveys are submitted.

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mwalsh's picture
mwalsh
• 09/12/13
• Posted in Data Collection
• 0 Comments

The PPI survey is designed to be administered in the client’s home by a trained enumerator for two primary reasons: the enumerator is there to help explain certain key terms and concepts, and the enumerator can visually verify the answers to some questions, such as the materials used in the construction of the roof or walls of the house.

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